Children's Festival of Welsh History 2016

Locations

Compass

Tŷ Mawr Wybrnant

Tŷ Mawr Wybrnant

William Morgan was born in 1545 at Tŷ Mawr, Wybrnant. He was one of five children and his parents were tenants on the estate of the powerful Wynn family of Gwydir, near Llanrwst. The road running by Wybrnant was a main drovers road in William Morgan’s time, and the family would often welcome the drovers and poets to their humble home.

It was a family tradition of the Wynn’s to take the ablest children of their tenants to be educated at Gwydir by the family tutor. As well a being educated by the travelling bards and mintrels who called at Tŷ Mawr, William Morgan was tutored at Gwydir, before heading to St John’s College Cambridge at the age of twenty.

Throughout his career, William Morgan served many parishes throughout Wales, but he is mainly associated with the vicarage of Llanrhaeadr - yn - Mochnant, because he stayed there from 1578 to 1595, and it was there that he translated the Bible into Welsh.

The first Welsh language Bible was published in 1588.

Cyfarthfa Park and Castle

Cyfarthfa Park and Castle

Covering 65 hectares it occupies a prominent position overlooking the town of Merthyr Tydfil and the historic site of the Cyfarthfa Ironworks. The Park also provides a beautiful backdrop to the Grade I listed Cyfarthfa Castle, former home to the illustrious Crawshay family, and is recognised as being the best example of a 19th century Ironmaster’s residence to have survived in South Wales.

Beaumaris Castle

Beaumaris Castle

Beaumaris Castle, in Beaumaris, Anglesey, Wales, was built as part of Edward I's campaign to conquer north Wales after 1282. A World Heritage Site, Beaumaris Castle has a perfect concentric design, is surrounded by a water moat, and has stunning views over the Menai straits and Snowdonia mountain range.

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

Designed and built by Thomas Telford and William Jessop, Pontcysyllte means ‘the bridge that connects’. This World Heritage Site is a magnet for those who want to experience one of the most remarkable achievements of the industrial revolution.

Seion Chapel Corwen

Seion Chapel Corwen

Owain Glyndŵr day is celebrated on September 16 to commemorate the day he was announced Prince of Wales in 1400. Corwen holds an annual festival, and the Bishop William Morgan show will feature in this years' festivities. THe show will be held at Eglwys Seion, situated on Stryd y Bont, near the well known statue of Owain Glyndŵr.

Memo Theatre, Barry

Memo Theatre, Barry

David Davies was a farmer with a natural talent for engineering, building his first bridge in Llandinam. He went on to build many other roads and bridges and in 1855 had the opportunity to be involved with the construction of the Llanidloes and Newtown Railway. Several other railway projects followed in North, Mid, and West Wales. He became a director of the Brecon and Merthyr Railway and with the money he made through all the successful railway ventures, he began founding collieries in the 1860s. The Ocean Merthyr company was formed under his chairmanship in 1867 and by the 1880s the output from his collieries had increased so much that he established a limited liability company, the Ocean Coal Company Ltd. At this time, Bute docks in Cardiff and the Taff Vale railway were struggling to cope with the high traffic volume, which led Davies and a group of other industrialists to construct new docks at Barry, with a railway connection from the Rhondda. This major project was completed in 1889 and at the time of Davies’s death in 1890, the Ocean Coal Co ltd was the largest and most profitable coal company in South Wales.

Llŷn Maritime Museum

Llŷn Maritime Museum

This little gem of a museum is well worth a visit! Come and catch a glimpse of Llŷn’s rich maritime history. The past will come alive as you discover the fascinating history of seafaring captains and their ships, shipbuilding, fishing, through our extensive collection of artefacts, pictures, maritime equipment old flags etc, with many hands-on activities for children, and a superb short film on the history of Nefyn. With a café , well-stocked shop and friendly crew on board to help you, this is the ideal place to ‘stay a while’.

www.llyn-maritime-museum.co.uk

Rhuddlan Castle

Rhuddlan Castle

Edward I built the castle between 1277 and 1282, at a cost of nearly £10,000. The castle was designed to be a magnificent fortress, to be supplied by sea, and 2 miles of the river next to the castle was deepened and straightened to make this possible. This work may have involved as many as 1800 - 2000 men, digging the ditches by hand. As well as the great castle walls we can see today, a huge wall with a square tower at each end defended the castle from attack from the river.

In 1284, the Statute Rhuddlan was signed here - it created the counties of Flintshire, Caernarvonshire, Anglesey, Meirionnydd, Ceredigion and Carmarthenshire, and established a system of government which lasted for 250 years.

Owain Glyndŵr's rebellion began in 1400, and his forces ravaged the town of Rhuddlan and attacked the castle but didn’t manage to take this powerful castle.

Powis Castle and Garden

Powis Castle and Garden

Powis Castle was originally built in the mid-13th century by a Welsh prince, Gruffudd ap Gwenwynwyn, wanting to establish his independence from his traditional enemies, the princes of Gwynedd.

The Herbert family spent over 400 years transforming the medieval fortress into the grand but comfortable home you see today. Furnished with sumptuous fabrics and exquisite works of art from around the world, the interior reflects the Elizabethan period through to the 1940s when a girls’ school was evacuated to the castle during the war.

With views across the Severn Valley, the world-renowned garden features clipped yews and shelters rare and tender plants. Laid out under the influence of Italian and French styles, it retains its original lead statues and an orangery on the terraces.

Strata Florida

Strata Florida

Strata Florida, or Ystrad Fflur as local people know it, is the final resting place for generations of medieval Welsh princes. The great poet Dafydd ap Gwilym is said to be buried under a yew in the churchyard. No wonder it’s been called ‘the Westminster Abbey of Wales’.

It was established by white-robed Cistercian monks as part of a movement that spread like a tidal wave across the whole of western Europe in the early Middle Ages. Soon it became the most famous church in Wales after St Davids –­ a place of pilgrimage and a linchpin of Welsh culture.

Caernarfon docks

Caernarfon docks

Caernarfon's coastline saw significant development during the first decades of the 19th century, as new wharves were constructed to export slate from Dyffryn Nantlle's quarry. Doc Fictoria was constructed between 1868 and 1875, further expanding Caernarfon's shipping powers, enabling general trade to be connected with the town and nearby areas, whilst the Slate Quay was used exclusively for shipping slate.

Doc Fictoria was reopened as a marina for leisure boats in 1997, with further development to build homes and leisure facilities following suite. Standing next to Galeri, and with stunning views over the Menai Strait, a signpost on the dock states the distance to many of the world's cities, reminding us that Caernarfon once was one of the leading nautical centres of the world.

Yr Ysgwrn

Yr Ysgwrn

A modest hill farm hunkered on the southern slopes of Cwm Prysor, Yr Ysgwrn has been an unlikely visitor attraction since Hedd Wyn’s death in 1917. A renowned Welsh poet, he was killed in action during the First World War. He was posthumously awarded the 1917 National Eisteddfod Chair at Birkenhead for his ode Yr Arwr (The Hero). Pilgrims from far and wide have visited Yr Ysgwrn, now managed by Snowdonia National Park, to view the iconic Black Chair.

Owain Glyndŵr Centre

Owain Glyndŵr Centre

The Owain Glyndŵr Centre is built on the site of the famous parliament held in 1404 at which Owain was crowned Prince of Wales. This Grade 1 listed building was given to the town of Machynlleth by Lord Davies of Llandinam in February, 1912.

The Centre hosts a new interactive and informative exhibition on the life, times and vision of Owain Glyndŵr - rebel leader, national hero and self appointed prince of Wales at the beginning of the fifteenth century.

The National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

The National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

The National Waterfront Museum, located by the Marina in Swansea, tells the story of industry in Wales, as well as it’s maritime history. There is also a strong social history element to the exhibitions.

St Fagans National History Museum

St Fagans

A walk around Wales - from Celtic times to the present day. St Fagans is one of Europe's leading open-air museums and Wales's most popular heritage attraction and admission is free! The ‘In Character’ performance will take place in the Lecture Theatre of the Weston Centre for Learning.

Archived locations

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