Children's Festival of Welsh History 2016

Locations

Compass

Yr Ysgwrn

Yr Ysgwrn

A modest hill farm hunkered on the southern slopes of Cwm Prysor, Yr Ysgwrn has been an unlikely visitor attraction since Hedd Wyn’s death in 1917. A renowned Welsh poet, he was killed in action during the First World War. He was posthumously awarded the 1917 National Eisteddfod Chair at Birkenhead for his ode Yr Arwr (The Hero). Pilgrims from far and wide have visited Yr Ysgwrn, now managed by Snowdonia National Park, to view the iconic Black Chair.

Canolfan Ni, Corwen

Canolfan Ni, Corwen

Owain Glyndŵr day is celebrated on September 16 to commemorate the day he was announced Prince of Wales in 1400. Corwen holds an annual festival, and the Bishop William Morgan show will feature in this years' festivities. THe show will be held at Eglwys Seion, situated on Stryd y Bont, near the well known statue of Owain Glyndŵr.

Owain Glyndŵr Centre

Owain Glyndŵr Centre

The Owain Glyndŵr Centre is built on the site of the famous parliament held in 1404 at which Owain was crowned Prince of Wales. This Grade 1 listed building was given to the town of Machynlleth by Lord Davies of Llandinam in February, 1912.

The Centre hosts a new interactive and informative exhibition on the life, times and vision of Owain Glyndŵr - rebel leader, national hero and self appointed prince of Wales at the beginning of the fifteenth century.

Cardigan Castle

Cardigan Castle

Cardigan Castle occupies a naturally strategic position which overlooks the lowest crossing point of the River Teifi affording spectacular views both seaward and inland. Lord Rhys is believed to have started rebuilding the castle in stone in 1171, the first Welsh man to build a stone Castle. In 1176, to mark the completion of the Castle, Lord Rhys held the first ever Eisteddfod, a celebration which included competitions between poets and harpists.

A few centuries after the first Eisteddfod was held at the castle, Henry Tudor, in his attempt to recruit an army to fight against Richard lll at Bosworth, called at Cardigan Castle to gather support.

Today, following a major restoration project, Cardigan Castle is open to the public for all to enjoy. It’s home to an exhibition on the history of the Eisteddfod, as well as a year long programme of varied events.

National Wool Museum

Wool was historically the most important and widespread of Wales’s industries. The picturesque village of Dre-fach Felindre in the beautiful Teffi valley, at the turn of the 19th century was the centre of a thriving woollen industry, earning the nickname ‘The Huddersfield of Wales’. The two World Wars made huge fortunes for the mills as fabric was needed to clothe millions of soldiers. However, after the Second World War, the price of wool plummeted and the mills began to close down.

The National Wool Museum is located in the historic former Cambrian Mills. Shirts and shawls, blankets and bedcovers, woollen stockings and socks were all made here, and sold in the surrounding countryside - and to the rest of the world.

The Museum displays tell the story of the Woollen Industry through working machinery, archive material, and exciting hands-on displays and textile gallery.

The National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

The National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

The National Waterfront Museum, located by the Marina in Swansea, tells the story of industry in Wales, as well as it’s maritime history. There is also a strong social history element to the exhibitions.

Raglan Castle

Raglan Castle

In 1462, King Edward IV placed 5 year old Henry Tudor in the custody of Yorkist William Herbert, who owned Raglan Castle, and his wife, to be brought up at Raglan. Henry’s mother was only 13, and his father had died of plague before he was born. Henry Tudor stayed at Raglan castle for nearly 10 years.

Whilst at Raglan, Henry was tutored by two clerics, Edward Haseley and Andrew Scot, and perhaps trained in gentlemanly pursuits by Sir Hugh Johnys. He learned some archery, and may have learnt some Welsh while he was there, as the Herbert family and servants all spoke Welsh.

William Herbert had hoped to marry Henry Tudor to his eldest daughter, Maud, but he died before that could be arranged. Henry Tudor escaped from Raglan Castle, back to Pembroke Castle, when he was 14 years old.

St Fagans National History Museum

St Fagans

A walk around Wales - from Celtic times to the present day. St Fagans is one of Europe's leading open-air museums and Wales's most popular heritage attraction and admission is free! The ‘In Character’ performance will take place in the Lecture Theatre of the Weston Centre for Learning.

Tretower Court and Castle

Tretower Court and Castle

For over 900 years Tretower Court and Castle has been altered, adjusted and adapted. Much of this was done to keep up with style, fashion and the tastes of the time.

The Picards and the Vaughans who lived here were rich influential Welsh families; the movers and shakers of their time. They needed a place to impress. And the sumptuous accommodation they created reflected their high status as Welsh gentry.

Now, in the 21st Century we’ve recreated a suite of rooms as they may have been in 1470 when the Vaughans were part of high society. Here you can discover a sophisticated way of life: from intricately carved furniture right down to the pots and pans of a working kitchen. Experience 15th century living at its best.

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct

Designed and built by Thomas Telford and William Jessop, Pontcysyllte means ‘the bridge that connects’. This World Heritage Site is a magnet for those who want to experience one of the most remarkable achievements of the industrial revolution.

The Copper Kingdom Museum

The Copper Kingdom Museum

Copper has been mined at Parys Mountain since the Bronze Age and the Copper Kingdom Museum illustrates how things evolved until the “Great Discovery” of Copper in 1768. From here on until the turn of the 20th century Amlwch was to be recognised as a place of industry and renowned opportunity.

Theatr Soar

Theatr Soar

Theatr Soar is part of Canolfan Soar. Canolfan Soar houses all the Welsh language organisations in the area, Caffi Cwtsh, Siop y Ganolfan and, of course, Theatr Soar, which is a bilingual, community Theatre.

Theatr Soar’s doors were officially opened in 2011 with it’s aim to open creative doors to everyone in Merthyr Tudful, whatever their linguistic background and to demolish the linguistic and cultural barriers that exist.

Archived locations

2017 locations
2016 locations
2015 locations